Worlds Dirtiest Oil

The Price No One Wants To Discuss

The price of gasoline in Hawaii is now hovering right around $5.00 a gallon and the traditional increase in price that now occurs every summer looms just around the corner. The conversation about the high fuel cost is now heard everywhere. Peoples lives are being seriously affected as weekly paychecks are already stretched thin. Business and communities are also feeling the pinch on how to cover the transportation needs and stay within budget. It is a dilemma of vast proportions.

There are those that see a solution in  off shore deep water drilling, opening the arctic refuge and the Alberta tar sands reserves and related pipelines that will allow relief from further increase in the price of oil. Any objections to these alternatives are often met with stiff arguments. The arguments are always selfish, self serving and misguided. An important fact seldom comes into the equation.

The price, demand and supply is not the critical issue with oil and gasoline. The unspoken fact is that the continued burning of fossil fuel (in this case petroleum) adds to the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere. If modern and developing nations do not reduce CO2 emissions climate change is inevitable. This is fact. The price at the pump today is not worth the future my children. That is the price no one wants to discuss.

Garth Lenz was a speaker in Victoria, Canada for  a Ted Talks presentation in January of 2012. This is the true cost of oil.

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About earthstonestation

promoting environmental education, protecting all species and preserving the wild places with art, music and storytelling.
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7 Responses to Worlds Dirtiest Oil

  1. FeyGirl says:

    so many thanks for your beautiful and educational posts… http://serenityspell.com/2012/05/06/a-wonderful-project/

  2. jpgreenword says:

    Wonderful post and great video. I don’t know how anyone can watch it and not (at least) question the morality of the Tar Sands.

  3. Yes, we’ve been hearing about the Alberta Tar Sands. Lots of talk but money breeds money breeds money. The think tank seems to be stuck on the NOW. Never mind about tomorrow and next year and so on. Thank you for sharing this video.

    • jpgreenword says:

      I am one the many Canadians who do not support the Alberta Tar Sands. It is a horrible projects who’s impacts will be with Canada for generations. And those impacts are not only environmental (although those are mighty huge), but social and political. Our economy has become desperately dependent on the Tar Sands since it seems to be the only part of our economy that gets government support. There is little to no support for renewable energy sources… we actually have NO energy policy. And we have no plan to deal with climate change. In fact, discussion of the subject is completely non-existent at the Federal level.
      Oh, and we subsidize the oil and gas industry to the tune of about 1,4 billion $ per year. We are gutting our public sector for the sake of “balancing the budget”, but those subsidies are still in place.
      And yet many Canadians blindingly support the Tar Sands because “it creates jobs and revenue”. Never mind that our government is calling environmental groups “enemies of Canada” for opposing pipelines that would start at the tar sands. Or the fact that more than 100 Native Canadian (First Nations) groups are opposed to such a pipeline and the government is ignoring their constitutionally protected right to stop such a project from going through their land.

      OK. I feel better that I got that off my chest. But it is still a horrible project.

      • It is indeed a horrible project, one that has consequences on a global level. A few temporary jobs are not worth this boondoggle that will affect wildlife, water, humans and climate for countless decades.

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