Last Frost

Last frost – not quite.

This has been a mild winter across much of north America and spring arrived early with record warm temperatures. Eyes have been on the early crocus  blooms and the mind has turned to planning for the vegetables  to be.

While I am away my neighbor keeps an eye on my homestead the Lower Farm. The ground had been very dry so some moisture from an April 4th snow was welcome. The last frost is mid May and time is short to make a plan and choose the seeds  that will grow the food to grace the table. Are you putting a garden plan together ?

Lower Farm 4/4/12 Anne Thomas

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About earthstonestation

promoting environmental education, protecting all species and preserving the wild places with art, music and storytelling.
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5 Responses to Last Frost

  1. df says:

    Our seedlings are well underway inside our house and we plan to move them out to our newly constructed (unheated) greenhouse in the next week or so. We won’t do any direct sowing until some time in May. We’re in Eastern Ontario and ‘last frost’ dates are shifting like everyone else’s, but it’s looking as though we may well have had our last frost of the season. Hard to tell, of course, which is why we’ll only put transplants into the greenhouse with some row cover until we’re sure.

  2. We don’t start planting in southern Ontario (Canada) until AFTER May 24 to avoid any thread of frost. Since I moved in with my daughter and her family, I let her husband do all the planting. This avoids differences of opinions and I have lots of those.

  3. Pit says:

    Here [Karnes City, southern Texas] spring has arrived a few weeks ago, and it’s really wonderful [http://pitstexasexpatblog.wordpress.com/2012/03/28/spring-pictures-1/]. Gardening so far has mainly been mowing the lawn [me], plus planting some flowers [my wife].

  4. Cathy says:

    I will start sowing under cover in the next two weeks I hope! (Zucchini, squash, peas, beetroot, carrots…) We often get a frost in May too, so we have to keep vigilant and cover up any delicate plants. Lower Farm must be quite a contrast to Hawaii!

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